lokifan: smiling Ignis, out of fatigues (Ignis: smile)
[personal profile] lokifan
The FFXV is basically all smut with people being nice to each other, which speaks to this weird new experience of having no hate-ships in a fandom. (Unless you count how much I wanna write Luna and Ardyn having a weird fucked-up thing where they’re fascinated by each other’s approaches to & experiences with their own deaths, which I don’t, quite.)

Final Fantasy XV fic recs )

Harry Potter fic recs )

Marvel fic recs )

Buffy fic recs )

Final Fantasy XV art recs )
kaberett: Photo of a pile of old leather-bound books. (books)
[personal profile] kaberett
okay so -- ego depletion is, broadly, the idea that self-control is a finite resource and if you do a thing that takes a lot of self-control you will have less of it left for subsequent tasks within [time-frame]; a recent-ish replication study found that it's not actually an effect that... exists.

what I am curious about, and lacking (ha) the focus etc to track down for myself, is: how does this conception of self-control interact with issues of decision fatigue and executive dysfunction? is self-control being formulated as meaningfully distinct from decision-making?

thank you in advance for indulging my idle curiosity <3
[personal profile] swaldman

OK, something re Brexit negotiations that should be obvious but doesn't seem to be for all:

For the UK, May's deal is better than no deal.
For the EU, May's deal is better than no deal.

That match in benefits is why it was agreed, after a lot of wrangling, including over the backstop (remember, many in the EU don't like the backstop either, seeing it as a major concession - they see it as pre-negotiating the continuing relationship, offering a customs union for nothing).

Now, everybody is talking about removing the backstop (or amending it in such a manner that it is no longer a backstop, and is hence effectively removed).

For the UK, this would (arguably) be better than May's deal, and hence still better than no deal.
For the EU, this would be worse than no deal[1].

We are, therefore, never going to reach agreement on this; the EU will never agree to remove the backstop[2]. It doesn't matter how much we run down the clock and threaten no deal instead, because they would *rather* have no deal instead. As a number of cartoonists have pointed out, we're trying to force the other side to do something by holding a gun to our own collective head.

[1] No deal involves some economic hit, everywhere but especially in Ireland. Ireland can be supported through this. Removing the backstop involves potentially screwing over an existing member to please a leaving member, and demonstrating to all future negotiating partners that the EU will back down if they demand the same thing often and loudly enough.
[2] Unless appropriate Alternative Arrangements can be found, which nobody has managed for the last two years.

Waitress

Feb. 21st, 2019 11:17 pm
lokifan: text: Exit, pursued by a bear (exit pursued by a bear)
[personal profile] lokifan
Celebrating my birthday by trying to actually write about (or even mention) some of the theatre I see.

29 is a weird birthday - I keep thinking of ways to celebrate 30! - but it’s been a nice day. And on Monday I did fun stuff, and on Saturday I’m having a joint party with a BFF whose birthday is tomorrow. Yay :D

So yeah, Waitress just arrived in London and I got preview tickets for a great rate from a colleague who gets group rates, so I went last week, with @januarium and @mokatiki. I hadn’t even known it was a film, I knew nothing about it besides that the soundtrack in particular had got rave reviews.

The songs are indeed great! YAY. Sara Bareilles is very hit-or-miss for me as a singer-songwriter, although I really love the songs I like, and I’m really glad these worked for me.

The musical itself was fun, despite some messy bits. Things I liked & things I didn’t )

So I can see it going either way for people, but I enjoyed it a lot.

Don Cheadle says Protect Trans Kids

Feb. 20th, 2019 10:25 pm
lokifan: Woman with rainbow warpaint (Rainbow warrior)
[personal profile] lokifan
On Monday, when [tumblr.com profile] januarium was trying to remember if she’d seen Iron Man 3, I reminded her of what happened by saying “Pepper gets Extremis, and there’s this great bit where Rhodey wears a green shirt.” AND NOW DON CHEADLE HAS WORN AN EVEN BETTER SHIRT.

Don Cheadle Says Protect Trans Kids

<333333333333333333333333333333333333333

(God. That photo makes me want to hug him then climb him like a tree.)

(In other Protect Trans Kids news, Mermaids UK just got a grant :D Fuck the TERFs trying to mess with the funding of a charity that supports young trans people.)

Hank Green & Holly Bourne

Feb. 19th, 2019 11:22 pm
lokifan: Four hands holding each other's wrists to strengthen each other, text "we are fandom" (Fandom: unity)
[personal profile] lokifan
Last night I went to see Holly Bourne (British YA author -- her themes seem to be feminism and mental health, and the new one involves the internet) interview Hank Green (Vlogbrother, CrashCourse and Vidcon creator) about An Absolutely Remarkable Thing. Which is a very good book.

book and interview stuff )
kaberett: a watercolour of a pale gold/salmon honeysuckle blossom against a background of green leaves (honeysuckle)
[personal profile] kaberett
I didn't (unsurprisingly) get the greenhouse, but looking at it did substantially clarify my thoughts and the eBays do regularly contain less fancy greenhouses that, actually, probably will perfectly well do the job now I know what I'm after.

In which I ramble about hardware and tell stories about secateurs. )

In terms of my upcoming jobs and planting...

Well, I need to spend some quality time pruning the Ribes bushes various; the plot came with a red dessert gooseberry, a redcurrant, and what-I-think-is-a-jostaberry, all of which are a little neglected and tangled. Tidying them up was on the list for Sunday immediately after the teasels, but a pair of secateurs that couldn't handle a teasel was... erstrecht not going to cope with actual wood. They also need top dressing with manure and then probably mulching, but that can wait until after I've tidied them up a little.

Next door, I've come to the conclusion that what I want to do with my ground-level bed (squash, pak choi, and failed calabrese last year) this season is set some broad beans and peas going down the middle around now, and then sow quinoa down the edges some time later. On the one hand, it's not known that this is a good idea; on the other, intercropping legumes and quinoa is a topic of active research and growing trials, and it looks to me like it ought to be sensible, so no doubt you will collectively get Running Commentary while I experiment.

At home, it's time for me to get the purple chillis and the orange bell peppers started (if I'm going to); that can't really happen until we're back full time, and while I'm happy to heat the house to a temperature that is safe and adequate for me to exist in when I'm actually there most of the time, that is... less the case when I'm away. (I'm attempting to resist the temptation to acquire a heated propagator.) Also the tomatoes, though there the thing I really need to do is work out where I want to put them -- whether I want to grow them on at home again, or if I'll be looking to plant them out at the plot.

Which is a general problem -- the working-out-where-to-plant-things. I'm dithering but probably about to come down on the side of putting the saffron bulbs in around the base of the cherry tree; I think I know where I'm going to put the comfrey once it's established itself a little better; and I'm tentatively leaning towards growing the poppies-for-seed in a patch of mixed wildflowers. (WHERE, though, Alex, you need to work out where you're going to put this. Probably also in the general vicinity of the cherry, if we're honest.)

But. Yes. Priorities: getting misc. seeds started; actually sourcing and constructing my proper raised beds so that I can plant out into them (which will inevitably involve More Weeding); pruning and dressing the Ribes; and working out what I want by way of asparagus, because my mother has offered to buy me some crowns.

So, you know, if you have asparagus cultivar recommendations, please by all means go ahead! I prefer the stems to the tips, and I am resigned to growing at least some purple...

Ten years!

Feb. 19th, 2019 10:29 am
wildeabandon: me kissing my beloved boy (pretty boys kissing)
[personal profile] wildeabandon
This Saturday was the tenth anniversary of me asking [personal profile] obandsoller to be my "It's Complicated" on Facebook. Ten years! There's a part of me that can't quite believe anyone could put up with me for that long, but when I'm not being self-deprecating, I know that actually we're really good together, and that both of us have done the work to make that happen. There are many things I love about him - how thoughtful and observant he is, the way he appreciates art and words and games and brings things out of them that I'd never notice, his engagement with the world and his passion for justice, his playfulness, his stylishness... I could go on.

But alongside that, there's a lot I really love about the relationship, which is a slightly different thing. I love how safe and secure it makes me feel - the absolute bone deep certainty that he will always be on my side, helping me up when I screw up, and cheering me on when I try to do difficult things. I love how affectionate we are, constantly cuddling and nibbling and reaching out and squeezing each others hands. I love that we like each other very much, and that we tell each other, and why. I love that we do little things for one another - he rubs my neck and shoulders when they're tense, and I bring him tea in the mornings. I love that even when we argue, which doesn't happen all that often, we both try really hard to do so constructively even when we're feeling frustrated, and that we continue to affirm our affection even as we argue. We are both lucky to have such a wonderful partnership, but it isn't just luck, and I think we can both be justly proud of what we've built together.

We celebrated our anniversary with a romantic meal at home - much like the weekend we first got together.

Photos of food and us looking adorable behind the cut )

What I did in January 2019

Feb. 18th, 2019 01:28 pm
squirmelia: (Default)
[personal profile] squirmelia
Growing Underground

I visited an underground farm and ate salad that was grown there! It was a farm in a disused air raid shelter.

I played musical games and typing games and beat 'em ups and other games at the National Videogames Museum in Sheffield with [profile] cerebros_vivos and it was excellent to catch up.

I saw Mary Poppins Returns and Colette at the cinema with [personal profile] doseybat.

I went to Croydon on multiple occasions! I went to an Ingress First Saturday there and also to Croydon Fun Weekend! I played a game by Kevan, ate food at Uncle Lim's, had a vegan chocolate and rosewater milkshake at Shakeaway, went on a pub crawl, went on a guided walk, played boardgames at the Ludoquist.

I drank Mexican Lion Boy coffee, ate chicory coffee chocolate chip flavour nitro ice-cream, and also ate a vegan sausage roll at Greggs.

I went to London Burning Pub at the Miller Pub and to a birthday party at the Apple Tree.

I saw Daniel Kitson's Keep and oh, it was funny and moving and good.

I did Veganuary and ate vegan for a month.

On New Year's Day I went to Hastings with my mum and the sun shone and we watched drummers there.
kaberett: Trans symbol with Swiss Army knife tools at other positions around the central circle. (Default)
[personal profile] kaberett
with all the usual caveats about how noisy crowds + not being able to easily move away from people smoking &c all sounds utterly miserable and like it will wreck me for days and possibly weeks--

-- which means that I probably want a sign that reads something to the tune of "Leaving the house was a bad idea. Leaving the EU would be worse." Right? Should I be making it pithier and more entertaining? Is it even a coherent idea?

What I did in December 2018

Feb. 18th, 2019 09:55 am
squirmelia: (Default)
[personal profile] squirmelia
Building in Sheffield

I went to St Albans for Christmas and spent time with my family. We played with umbrellas and watched Mary Poppins, ran around trees, caught bubbles and saw where fairies live.

I learnt that some buildings have shoes hidden in the walls, at the Spellbound: Magic, Ritual and Witchcraft exhibition at the Ashmolean, which I visited in Oxford with [personal profile] glyn.

I played on the swing inside the birdcage at St Pancras, while waiting for a train.

I reminisced about taking photos of cranes and being given a lift in a police van, with [profile] flangey, when we caught up in the Devonshire Cat.

I ate yellow peach sorbet and vegan apple turkey stuffing ice-cream.

I visited the Museum of London one lunchtime and saw the Experimental photography exhibition.

I had lunch at a Turkish restaurant to celebrate [profile] jacqui_c's birthday.

I went to Bleak Christmas and ate a slightly bleak dinner and sang carols and happy birthday to Jesus and chanted “Je-sus” a few times.

I visited the Orleans House Gallery and the Stables Gallery and saw the exhibitions and then wandered around Eel Pie Island as it was an open day.

I wandered around Bromley, shopping with my mum, for unicorn onesies and spaceship sweatshirts.

I saw ice melting outside the Tate Modern and video clips of certain times Marclay's Clock inside.

At Somerset House, I saw the Athi-Patra Ruga: Of Gods, rainbows and omissions exhibition.

I ate Vietnamese food with [personal profile] doseybat in Ravenscourt Park.

I visited the vegan Christmas market at the Guildhall Yard.

Ingress:

I went to the Ingress Enlightened Monthly Social.

I did the Kingston Pub Quiz Missions and walked around Kingston.

Consumption

Feb. 17th, 2019 08:31 pm
kaberett: Trans symbol with Swiss Army knife tools at other positions around the central circle. (Default)
[personal profile] kaberett
Reading. I finished Predators' Gold! It did not redeem itself, to my tastes. I then proceeded to have a bit of a tailspin about "do I object to fiction that portrays people doing bad things without getting 'adequately' punished or without it getting called out in the text? am I secretly an anti?" but the answer is, on reflection, no -- I don't think it's Immoral Art That Should Be Banned, it's just that I've got a very long reading list including a bunch of books I am actually excited (rather than cross) about, and I abruptly Really Don't Care about these characters enough to invest any more time in them at all whatsoever. Meanwhile, I have not been reading much because reasons, but Dreams from My Father reappeared from the library so I'm working slowly on that. Also I finally scraped together the brain to read the most recent shortfic associated with your blue-eyed boys ("shortfic": one of them was 23k words), which was immensely soothing.

Growth. I went to the allotment today! The fennel died back a lot in the frosts but I'm hopeful that 1. it will continue turning into food (it's putting forth new feathery growth) and 2. some if it will get as far as making seeds. I pulled up all the teasels and got as many of them as I could before the cheap shitty secateurs broke, so those are in a neat pile, and did a very little hand-weeding. Happily, though, the combination of manure + weed-suppressant takeaway pizza boxes + wood chip meant that there was really very little weeding as needed done, which impressed me. Spinach is coming along nicely but probably needs thinning (and eating); to my surprise a nontrivial chunk of the remaining pak choi also survived the frosts and are now doing their determined best to flower.

When I got in on Wednesday night, I discovered that my comfrey crowns had finally arrived (on the second attempt) so I've now got those potted up on the patio to establish while I work out where to put them. This means that I also received the last of the seeds currently on order, though I am now seriously considering acquiring two kinds of basil, some caraway and sesame seed, some rocket, and maaaaybe some chickpeas, though chickpeas seem possibly even a step too far for me.

Alas I did not win the greenhouse I had been pining after, but it ended up going for about three times what I was willing or able to pay for it, which means I successfully do not feel bad about having "just missed out" or similar.

Lab supplies. So many lab supplies. I got to campus at around 9 on Thursday and... slightly didn't leave again til 2pm on Saturday, though hopefully by the next time I want to do anything of the sort I'll have 24h access enabled on my card so I'll be able to actually kip on the sofa in my head of group's office rather than drowzing underneath the computer table in the Bloody Cold. (I was wearing three jumpers, a scarf, and fingerless gloves, and I still spent most of those three days shivering.)

EU march

Feb. 17th, 2019 01:08 pm
ceb: (spotty)
[personal profile] ceb
There's another EU march in London on Saturday 23rd March. Unless a miracle happens and we, say, revoke A50 before then, I will be going, even though it means (sob) missing out on a £50 non-refundable Kettle's Yard workshop. I encourage everyone who can to go. I've been on two now and they're very cheery affairs. If you can't go for whatever reason but would like to be there in spirit, then let me know and I'll put you on a sign...

March webpage: https://www.peoples-vote.uk/march

Friday Five: Groceries

Feb. 16th, 2019 01:01 pm
jack: (Default)
[personal profile] jack
https://thefridayfive.dreamwidth.org/86278.html

1. Do you make up a dinner plan for the coming week?

No. Now, with two people in the house, we cook often enough it might be worth planning in advance, but just playing it by ear is working well enough. I used to do less proper cooking, when I didn't think about it at all, I only ever really bought things that kept, and treated each meal separately.

2. Do you make up a shopping list and stick to it when shopping?

There's not really a thing about sticking to it. I've been fortunate not to have to worry deeply about sticking for a budget, but I've also never really excitement to buy unusual things, so I don't usually have a big desire to buy other things (I mean, unless there's like books :)), I just want to get it done, so I don't need to make an effort to stick to a list.

I used to just usually buy the same staples. At some point I started keeping a list on my smartphone which was very convenient. Now we finally found a grocery list app we could both share which had been very convenient.

3. What is one thing that you always buy, but never put down on a list?

Nothing exciting, but things we need to refresh most often, like milk or bread, I usually have an idea if we have enough and just buy it, the list is more for things to buy "in the next few days".

4. Is there anything that you always think you are out of and come home with it to discover you already have a year’s supply on hand?

I can't think of anything specific, but things like flour, vanilla, jam that we only use every so often, I always forget if we have already.

5. Do you get your groceries delivered?

That would probably be more convenient but I keep not getting round to it. I used to not because I was out almost every evening and didn't know when I'd be in to get deliveries. I work right buy large tesco so I usually shop one small batch at a time at lunchtime.

[food] oh go on then

Feb. 16th, 2019 12:06 am
kaberett: a watercolour of a pale gold/salmon honeysuckle blossom against a background of green leaves (honeysuckle)
[personal profile] kaberett
Some of you have specifically mentioned being interested in seeing other people's responses to this week's [community profile] thefridayfive, and I'm sitting around nervously watching the mass spec run without the concentration to do anything more useful, so here you go.

Content note: this week's theme is grocery shopping and meal planning. My answers therefore involve mention of sensory issues with food, dietary restrictions, and disordered eating.

Read more... )


Of course, what these questions don't touch on is HAVE I MENTIONED I HAVE AN ALLOTMENT. :D I make choices about what to grow (and where) for convenience; for example, I don't like buying cut herbs because (i) I feel vaguely guilty and (ii) they're never the right quantities, but I do like fresh herbs, so in pots on the verandah I've got mint, parsley, rosemary, sage, chives, and bay. I'm on the verge of buying seeds for two kinds of basil; an honourable mention to the ancestral wild garlic, that springeth green. I also had tomatoes on the patio (... I still haven't decided what to call it; "decking" seems awfully USois, somehow, and isn't quite in my active vocabulary) this summer, which was convenient and enjoyable enough that I'm likely to do it again. (I might also try cucumbers on the patio, depending on how the weather goes and whether I actually buy a greenhouse.)

At the allotment I'm prioritising things it's ridiculously expensive to buy (poppy seed! caraway seed! hopefully, if I get my act together, asparagus! bay leaves! soft fruit! hopefully some saffron, thanks to [personal profile] ewt!), things that come in entirely the wrong amounts always and are awkward to store (spinach!), things I always wince over the cost of and can rarely be persuaded to indulge myself on (fennel! purple sprouting broccoli! pak choi! shallots! interesting salad leaves! hopefully passionfruit!), things that are Brightly Coloured (this season I'm going to be experimenting with Painted Mountain sweetcorn, rainbow quinoa and purple chillis, among others), things it's otherwise tricksy to find (root parsley! :D), and things that are Just Better when they're really ludicrously fresh (hiiiii peas). I'd already been trying to eat seasonally; I'm looking forward to spending more time paying attention to plants, and trying to remind myself that I'm not going to be starting everything off hideously too late even if I am only getting back from Belfast at the end of February.

This is of course my first year with the allotment so I don't... entirely have a sense of how my shopping patterns will actually be affected, but I Am Excited To Find Out: I've already been enjoying working with the rhubarb and beetroot neighbours have desperately fobbed off on me, and with the things I've managed to get going already. So, you know, if compatible with your diet, should you visit me over the summer there's a very high chance that you'll be fed Things What I Grew (That Aren't The Sourdough), and should I visit you you might get brought A Tribute...

Quiet week / Friday Five

Feb. 15th, 2019 12:16 pm
wildeabandon: photo of me with wavy hair and gold lipstick (Default)
[personal profile] wildeabandon
It's been a relatively uneventful week. Last weekend [personal profile] smhwpf came over so I could show him how I do the church bookkeeping, which he is very nobly taking off my hands, and on Sunday evening we had our monthly "House Date Night", and played Dominion, of which we very egalitarianly* won one game each. I went to another rehearsal of the university choir, which feels like it's going quite well. In particular, when the director made us get all mixed up and stand with the other parts, I was a lot more able to hold to the tenor line without following the people next to me than I expected to be.

On Thursday I took myself to the cinema to see All Is True, a heavily fictionalised biopic about Shakespeare's later life. It's got fairly variable reviews, and I think that's probably fair - the plot is a bit meandering, and some of the characters are a bit two-dimensional, but there's some stellar acting, and I very much appreciated the bi representation.

Friday Five on grocery shopping
1. Do you make up a dinner plan for the coming week?
Read more... )
kaberett: Photo of a pile of old leather-bound books. (books)
[personal profile] kaberett
spot the difference!

preferment: the selection of clergy to hold positions of senior office in the Church (of England) (largely obsolete)
preferment: a preparation of a portion of a bread dough that is made several hours or more in advance of mixing the final dough

my recreational reading, you see, currently includes a nontrivial amount of Austen and a nontrivial amount of The Theory Of Sourdough. APPARENTLY in this modern day and age we don't believe in clarifying punctuation. as a result I am spending a lot of time being very confused about theology.
jack: (Default)
[personal profile] jack
I've blogged about this ages ago, but apparently I never made myself understood.

Imagine you have a few characters, probably lovable misfits, a tough one, a hacker, a disguise artist, etc. The GM is adjudicating something simple and in theme, say the hacker needs to bypass an electronic keypad and then the tough one needs to spring through the door and take down half a dozen guards.

Traditional resolution mechanics, used commonly in all of simulationist games, tactical games, and lightweight narrative-focused games, go something like:

* Decide how hard each of those are for a typical human
* Each character gets a bonus for how much better than a typical human they are
* Then you resolve it.

It's important that the players and GM all have a similar idea how difficult these things actually are for the players, or they'll get into an argument about the resolution. But in truth... most of them will have watched a LOT of movies about tough ones who take down rooms full of guards, and never ever seen it in real life. So when you get to the "estimate difficulty" part, it's easier to estimate "for the tough one, taking out six surprised and lightly armed guards is of moderate difficulty" than to estimate "for a typical human, is this challenging? extreme? superhuman? something else?"

I'm considering an alternative, something like:

* Look at the obstacle as described by the GM
* Look at the character's ability
* Adjudicate "OK, for your specific character, that's easy/medium/hard/nigh-impossible", and roll a die that says "you succeed on an easy/medium/hard/impossible" challenge.

If you have a simulationist system, the traditional method is almost necessary. It's also a lot more practical if you have lots of different small bonuses, because adding those to the player's achievement is easier than subtracting them from the difficulty. But outside those situations, in theory, that system has some advantages: the GM doesn't need to model the characters abilities, just how hard the situation is; it means players usually get big numbers or lots of dice which is fun. But I'm not sure I actually believe those.

In practice, in creating a fun experience, the GM probably has a better idea of "I want to provide the players with this much of a challenge" than of "I want the situation to be this challenging in the abstract". Especially if there's modifiers being thrown around, it's easy for a "choose a difficulty, and then the players get bonuses" model to end up with "whoops, the player can just always/never succeed at this".

For instance, the players try to bribe a guard. Everyone expects that to happen in heroic fantasy all the time, so the GM gives it a fairly low difficulty. Now the players want to disguise themselves as laundry attendants to escape the castle. The GM does the same thing. But it turns out there's a mechanic for bribing but not disguise, or vice versa, so the players get a whacking great bonus to one of them and not the other, despite both being what you'd expect from the genre. It means the GM and player's instinctive knowledge of what the characters can do can work against them if the mechanics don't perfectly line up.

But with the new system, appropriate difficulties happen automatically if people forget themselves, but you can still calculate them in detail when you feel the need. The GM can always just assume that as long as the hacker does the hacking and the tough one does the bruising, most challenges will be "medium", but they can throw an "easy" or "hard" in there if they want. And if they DO want to make things more objective they can use a rule-of-thumb of "for every notch above typical human you are, you reduce the difficulty by one level" without wiring it into the rules of the universe.

What are the advantages of that system?

One is, as I said, it's easier to adjudicate difficulty on the fly if everyone has a good idea what the characters can do but not what a normal human can do.

Also, if characters want to work outside their specialities it also works better. Maybe "jumping a gap", anyone can try even if only the athlete can be assumed to succeed, but "picking a lock" you can't do at all unless you know. Most systems force you to pick one or the other of those for all possible tasks (or choose two possible levels, as with DnD's "take 10/take 20" system and restrictions on some skills without training). In this system, the GM can adjudicate on the fly what obviously makes sense in the situation at hand, even if it means some tasks which are medium for the hacker are hard for other characters and some are impossible. Whereas with a traditional resolution, if two different players want to try the same thing, it's easy to have the results break everyone's expectation of what the characters can achieve.

And, it implicitly puts the variance under the GM's command, not only the mean. If one character has a special ability that makes routine something that is usually far out of the reach of other characters, the flavour might still suggest that they some of those tasks are easy and some are hard for them. In a traditional resolution mechanic, you *also* need to make sure those difficulties are out of reach of other characters, except for the times they actually should be able to do it with sufficient effort. With the new system, you can simply assign difficulties for the character with the special ability, and worry about the other characters only if they try something like that.

I'm not sure if there's actually any use for this system, but thinking it through helped me think how abilities and difficulties work.

And I'm still confused by the responses I got when I talked about this before, which were mostly, "If you think that, you should try FUDGE" which I mean, sure, a popular widely used system probably is a lot better than one person's random idea, but it seems so irrelevant, since FUDGE uses exactly the same traditional resolution order as DnD, so I wasn't sure what they were trying to say.

Today in teeth

Feb. 13th, 2019 10:47 am
kaberett: Clyde the tortoise from Elementary, crawling across a map, with a red tape cross on his back. (elementary-emergency-clyde)
[personal profile] kaberett
Content notes/conversational parameters: brief discussion of oral health and teething; mention (no specifics) of anxiety dreams. On the whole I think teeth are skin-crawlingly awful, so please don't go into detail about oral damage/dental procedures/etc in comments. The level of detail in the post is probably a good guide. <3

Read more... )

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